A local NBC station in Dallas ran a story a few years ago about a DIY mechanic who saved himself thousands of dollars each year just by fixing his SUV himself. And all he did was watch videos on YouTube to learn how to make the necessary repairs to his Volvo XC90.

The Internet is a vast and powerful resource for so many things, and DIY auto repair is no exception. And sure, fixing other people’s cars and trucks is exactly what we get paid to do, but if we can save our customers some money with a little advice, that’s also what we do.

That said, there are inherent risks associated with vehicle service and repair. Proper tools should be used and safety measures should be taken. Protect yourself with safety glasses, hearing protection, dust masks, latex gloves and some common sense. Mistakes could result in injury or death. Mistakes could also incur expensive repair by a professional, which may not have been as expensive if you had consulted a professional in the first place. We have also seen DIY mistakes land “the do it yourselfer” in the doghouse with friends, neighbors, family members or all three. Our take is that most people have better things to do than fix their own cars. We aren’t recommending you perform your own auto repairs but if you are going to do it anyway you might find these resources helpful.


1. Popular Mechanics DIY Auto

Popular Mechanics has been a go-to resource for generations of tinkerers and handymen and -women. Recommended postDo I really need to wax my car?


2. CertifiedMasterTech

Maintained by 28-year industry veteran Mark Gittelman, the Certified Master Tech blog has more than 200 quality, in-depth posts on a wide variety of DIY auto repair issues. Recommended postDo I need a throttle body service?


3. Eric The Car Guy

Eric isn’t going to win any design awards for his blog, but the quality and depth of his advice are certainly noteworthy. Eric also has a lot of videos on his YouTube channel if you’re more of a visual learner. Recommended postWhat to do when your engine overheats


4. MyAutoRepairAdvice

Another professional mechanic who dispenses free advice online, Steve is an ASE Certified Master Automotive Technician who says he started his blog out of pure anger from seeing so many friends and customers flat-out lied to by previous mechanics. Recommended postSqueaking brakes

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5. Car Talk’s Do-It-Yourself Guide

The creators of NPR’s favorite car radio show have also put together a treasure trove of great articles for DIY auto mechanics. And they were nice enough to catalog all the articles so that the information is easy to navigate.


6. The Family Handyman: Automotive

The Family Handyman magazine’s blog seems to have picked up where Bob Villa’s old television show left off. It’s popular, too, with about 100,000 Facebook followers. The DIY Automotive section goes about car repair tips with the same diligence that made the magazine itself so widely read. Recommended post:


7. DoItYourself.com — General Car Repair

Time Magazine once voted DoItYourself.com one of the 50 best websites in the world. It has since been surpassed, as the DIY ethos has caught on among new communities, but its DIY car repair tips are straightforward, clear and always helpful.



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